Essential Reading

Insights from Quadrant
Insights from Quadrant

How to revitalize
Australia’s economy

Andrew Stone’s important new book lays out an economic agenda that is coherent and comprehensive, yet politically achievable over the next three to five years by a federal government with the resolve to implement it.

Order your copy here.

Addressing immigration, the housing market, higher education reform, federal?state relations, energy policy, workforce participation, welfare reform, budget repair, monetary policy and financial system regulation, the book demonstrates that good government worthy of the respect and support of the Australian people is not merely possible but vital.

What others are saying of Restoring Hope:

Niall Ferguson: “This is an ambitious program of structural as well as fiscal reform. Let us hope there are politicians willing to take the risks inherent in such a radical strategy.” 

Peter Costello:  “Andrew Stone reminds us that improving productivity is the key to future living standards in Australia. He identifies a range of areas where this could be examined. The hard work of economic reform cannot be done without explaining the options and building public support.”

John Howard:  “Andrew Stone has undertaken the difficult task of arguing in detail for a range of economic reforms. That he has done it at a time when, in the eyes of some, reform is in the doldrums is all the more praiseworthy. His analysis of the housing issue is impressive.”

Insights from Quadrant

Minister Wyatt makes
his preference clear

On Tuesday morning, Aboriginal Affairs minister Ken Wyatt could tap the wisdom of three people in regard to the ‘Voice” thing. They were Josephine Cashman, who recently complained to the Australian Federal Police that the Dark Emu author is a fraud, and her two fellow panellists, professors Marcia Langton and Tom Calma.

By Tuesday night, Minister Wyatt had only two advisers, having sacked Ms Cashman.

“Ms Cashman’s actions are not conducive to the constructive and collaborative approach required to progress the important co-design process for an indigenous voice,” Wyatt explained.

At this Twitter link, Ms Langton gives voice to the sort of counsel the minister evidently prefers.

Below, Ms Cashman and a voice he rejects.

Ms Langton prefers to believe that misquoted explorers’ journals are “correct”, that Aborigines lived in permanent towns, baked the first bread, invented democracy and were the original agriculturalists.

She obviously hasn’t read Peter O’Brien’s Bitter Harvest, which can be ordered here.

Insights from Quadrant

Bitter Harvest
now on sale

UPDATE: Indigenous Affairs Minister Ken Wyatt has sacked Josephine Cashman from his ‘Voice’ panel, apparently because she complained to the AFP that Bruce Pascoe is not an Aborigine bus has gained monetary advantage by presenting himself as such.

The Australian has the details.

_______________________

The highly readable vivisection of author Bruce Pascoe’s compendium of errors, misrepresentations and misquoted sources depicting Aborigines as sedentary agriculturalists with ‘skills superior to those of the white colonisers who took their land and despoiled it’ is available from Quadrant Books.

With the ABC pointedly ignoring any and all critiques of Dark Emu‘s fantasies as it peddles and promotes Pascoe’s shoddy scholarship, Bitter Harvest is essential reading for those who still believe truth matters.

Order your copy here

Insights from Quadrant

‘The demise of
academic history’

Readers of the Weekend Australian will have enjoyed Geoffrey Blainey’s feature essay on Captain Cook and his voyages — a theme also addressed by Quadrant‘s Keith Windschuttle, at left, in a column we first published in 2018 and reprise today for the Australia Day holiday.

Blainey’s article has inspired a series of spirited debates in The Australian‘s comments thread, with readers arguing the toss about everything from anti-scorbutics to Aboriginal “civilisation”. In the ink-and-paper Letters page, however, a missive from historian Greg Haines made it only so far as the editor’s spike — a pity, as it makes some cutting points about historians and the teaching of history in Australia’s universities. That letter, is reproduced below:

Geoffrey Blainey has well-served Australian History for over half a century. The intellectual pygmies of Melbourne University’s History school, led by careerist Stuart Macintyre, who replaced him as professor, have done so little. They have also pioneered the demise of academic history.

But these relatively irrelevant academics will continue to write their own obituaries, thus continuing the dreary life of their obscurantism. Their demise will have as its memorial empty lecture halls and tutorial rooms. It has already yielded a dearth of sound history tomes by academics, save fanciful, doubtful ones about Aboriginal history, pre-history too. Professorial chairs will remain empty as jobs disappear.

Australia’s imperilled history could well disappear for one or so generations. With it could go knowledge of Australia’s discovery and exploration and development and engineering, of its cultural evolution, of its science and wars and sport and music and schools and government and writing and the stories of its people, their songs of joy and of sorrow.

Compared with Blainey’s wonderful, continuing gifts to our culture, the legacy of these Melbourne (and other) anti-intellectual, academic historians looks like the wasteland of which T S Eliot wrote. A disgrace. Shame on our universities, their leaders especially.

Gregory Haines Ph.C., B.A., Ph.D.
Pharmacist and Historian

Essential Reading

Insights from Quadrant
Insights from Quadrant

How to revitalize
Australia’s economy

Andrew Stone’s important new book lays out an economic agenda that is coherent and comprehensive, yet politically achievable over the next three to five years by a federal government with the resolve to implement it.

Order your copy here.

Addressing immigration, the housing market, higher education reform, federal?state relations, energy policy, workforce participation, welfare reform, budget repair, monetary policy and financial system regulation, the book demonstrates that good government worthy of the respect and support of the Australian people is not merely possible but vital.

What others are saying of Restoring Hope:

Niall Ferguson: “This is an ambitious program of structural as well as fiscal reform. Let us hope there are politicians willing to take the risks inherent in such a radical strategy.” 

Peter Costello:  “Andrew Stone reminds us that improving productivity is the key to future living standards in Australia. He identifies a range of areas where this could be examined. The hard work of economic reform cannot be done without explaining the options and building public support.”

John Howard:  “Andrew Stone has undertaken the difficult task of arguing in detail for a range of economic reforms. That he has done it at a time when, in the eyes of some, reform is in the doldrums is all the more praiseworthy. His analysis of the housing issue is impressive.”

Insights from Quadrant

Minister Wyatt makes
his preference clear

On Tuesday morning, Aboriginal Affairs minister Ken Wyatt could tap the wisdom of three people in regard to the ‘Voice” thing. They were Josephine Cashman, who recently complained to the Australian Federal Police that the Dark Emu author is a fraud, and her two fellow panellists, professors Marcia Langton and Tom Calma.

By Tuesday night, Minister Wyatt had only two advisers, having sacked Ms Cashman.

“Ms Cashman’s actions are not conducive to the constructive and collaborative approach required to progress the important co-design process for an indigenous voice,” Wyatt explained.

At this Twitter link, Ms Langton gives voice to the sort of counsel the minister evidently prefers.

Below, Ms Cashman and a voice he rejects.

Ms Langton prefers to believe that misquoted explorers’ journals are “correct”, that Aborigines lived in permanent towns, baked the first bread, invented democracy and were the original agriculturalists.

She obviously hasn’t read Peter O’Brien’s Bitter Harvest, which can be ordered here.

Insights from Quadrant

Bitter Harvest
now on sale

UPDATE: Indigenous Affairs Minister Ken Wyatt has sacked Josephine Cashman from his ‘Voice’ panel, apparently because she complained to the AFP that Bruce Pascoe is not an Aborigine bus has gained monetary advantage by presenting himself as such.

The Australian has the details.

_______________________

The highly readable vivisection of author Bruce Pascoe’s compendium of errors, misrepresentations and misquoted sources depicting Aborigines as sedentary agriculturalists with ‘skills superior to those of the white colonisers who took their land and despoiled it’ is available from Quadrant Books.

With the ABC pointedly ignoring any and all critiques of Dark Emu‘s fantasies as it peddles and promotes Pascoe’s shoddy scholarship, Bitter Harvest is essential reading for those who still believe truth matters.

Order your copy here

Insights from Quadrant

‘The demise of
academic history’

Readers of the Weekend Australian will have enjoyed Geoffrey Blainey’s feature essay on Captain Cook and his voyages — a theme also addressed by Quadrant‘s Keith Windschuttle, at left, in a column we first published in 2018 and reprise today for the Australia Day holiday.

Blainey’s article has inspired a series of spirited debates in The Australian‘s comments thread, with readers arguing the toss about everything from anti-scorbutics to Aboriginal “civilisation”. In the ink-and-paper Letters page, however, a missive from historian Greg Haines made it only so far as the editor’s spike — a pity, as it makes some cutting points about historians and the teaching of history in Australia’s universities. That letter, is reproduced below:

Geoffrey Blainey has well-served Australian History for over half a century. The intellectual pygmies of Melbourne University’s History school, led by careerist Stuart Macintyre, who replaced him as professor, have done so little. They have also pioneered the demise of academic history.

But these relatively irrelevant academics will continue to write their own obituaries, thus continuing the dreary life of their obscurantism. Their demise will have as its memorial empty lecture halls and tutorial rooms. It has already yielded a dearth of sound history tomes by academics, save fanciful, doubtful ones about Aboriginal history, pre-history too. Professorial chairs will remain empty as jobs disappear.

Australia’s imperilled history could well disappear for one or so generations. With it could go knowledge of Australia’s discovery and exploration and development and engineering, of its cultural evolution, of its science and wars and sport and music and schools and government and writing and the stories of its people, their songs of joy and of sorrow.

Compared with Blainey’s wonderful, continuing gifts to our culture, the legacy of these Melbourne (and other) anti-intellectual, academic historians looks like the wasteland of which T S Eliot wrote. A disgrace. Shame on our universities, their leaders especially.

Gregory Haines Ph.C., B.A., Ph.D.
Pharmacist and Historian